How Do I Pair a Samsung Galaxy S3 to the Ford Sync System?

One of the hottest phones this Christmas season is the Samsung Galaxy S3 and for many users, they will need a quick tip on how to “pair” a Samsung to a Ford Sync System.

First, go to your phone’s App menu.

Tap the Settings folder

If it isn’t already on, Tap the Bluetooth box to turn it on.

Start up your Ford vehicle, go to the Phone Menu.

On the basic Sync System, use the “Seek” arrows to go to the System Settings folder. Then go to Bluetooth Devices, press OK, then use the arrows to find Add a Device, then press OK.

Press the OK button to begin “pairing” and your Sync system will create a 6-digit PIN. If you can, use the Seek Arrows on the steering wheel to toggle the screen until it says “Special PIN.” Push OK and select/create a number such as 0000 or 1234.

On the MyFord Touch system, on the lower left of the Phone page is the “Settings” button. Select that, and on the next screen, push the bar that says “Bluetooth Devices.” On the next screen will be the list of your connected Bluetooth Devices. Tap the “Add Device” to add a new one. The system will say “Search for Sync on your device and enter the PIN provided.” Samsung phones prefer a 4-digit PIN, so you can use the touch screen to “create” the PIN of either “0000” or “1234.”

Go to your phone and select “Search for Bluetooth Devices.”

In a moment, it will either “find” and automatically connect to Sync, or, you may have another screen appear with a place to enter the PIN number. Enter the PIN number and hit “Pair” on your phone.

This confirms the pairing process.

In a moment Sync should come back with a few more questions. Such as “Make Primary Phone?” “Turn on 911 Assist?” Push the OK button on your Sync system to approve the questions. Use the Seek buttons to toggle the “Yes” to “No,” if you’d like.

When you push OK to begin “Download Phone Book” your phone will make a chime.

If a sub-menu appears, tap the box to “Always Connect” the Sync connection.

If no box appears, “pull down” the menu from the top of the phone screen. It is referred to as the PBAP screen. Once again, tap the box to “Always Connect” the Sync system.

For most Sync systems, push the voice button and say “Bluetooth Audio” to access the music files on your Samsung. It may take up to 30 seconds for the system to start playing music on the phone. If it does not, go to your phone’s App menu and tap the icon for your music player. Or, tap the icon for an App such as Pandora. Your Pandora App will start streaming music through your dashboard.

Here is a Samsung and Sync video. (Special thanks to the folks at Phones4U – and you’ll like the English accent!).

Please, Just Say No to Emojis! These Apps Corrupt the Ford Sync System!

Using emoticons on your smartphone can cause severe problems with the voice-to-text functions of the Ford Sync System. This self-help article reveals ways to correct these problems.

Since late 2012 there were numerous problems with the iPhone 5, iPhone 4 and iPhone 4S as well as the Samsung Galaxy, the HTC Evo and other smartphones having connectivity issues with the Ford Sync system. User forums for these smartphones and for the Sync system have been filled with people which connectivity problems that affected the base model, the MyFord and the MyFord Touch Sync systems. The issue was something was seriously affecting the Sync users accessibility of their phone book contacts with Voice commands. If you pushed the “Voice” icon on your steering wheel and said “Phone” and then “Call + (your contact name)” then your Sync system might reply, “Calling Dot on Cell.”

Some of the issues were a result of smartphone users downloading and using any of the Emoji Apps. The word emoji is Japanese for ideograms, you know, those little emoticons such as smiley faces, “frowny” faces, etc.

The new Apple iOS even allows iPhone 5 users to go to their Settings folder, to the General settings, to the Keyboard tab, and then to the next menu to select “Keyboards.” You can then tap “Add New Keyboard” and add an emoji keyboard. However, this is the kiss of death for your Sync system.

The issue is that the cute emoticons seen on your smartphone screen as a smiley face are, in fact, long strings of programming language which cause Sync’s text-to-voice conversion to go haywire. When given a Voice command to call a contact the system will say “Calling Dot on Cell” and then dial the first contact listed in your phone book.

If this has happened, then review EVERY phone contact and remove any emoticon. Also remove any extraneous exclamation points, periods, commas, dashes and so on that you might have in your phone contact list. Be sure to even check the name of your device! Some overzealous users renamed their phones with smiley faces on the device name. Check to see that everything is cleared again. Then go to your Bluetooth settings and remove Sync from your phone.

If you have an iPhone, do a soft reset. This is done by holding your “Home” button, the large button at the lower center of your front screen, while also holding down the Power button at the top edge of the phone on the right side. Hold these buttons down until the Apple icon appears. Then release the buttons. Let the phone go idle for a few minutes. You can further push the power button, then slide the on-screen button to power down the phone. Leave the phone off for a few minutes. Then push the power button and let the phone power back up.

Then go to your vehicle. Go to your phone settings and delete your phone from the list of Bluetooth devices. Then turn your vehicle off. Open the hood and find the car battery. Loosen and remove the black (negative) battery cable) for about five minutes. Then replace the cable and tighten the clamp. Close the hood and restart the vehicle. Let a few minutes pass before resetting the radio from AM and resetting the clock. Then go to your phone settings and pair your phone back. See this video for instructions on pairing a phone.

Yes, this is a lot to do. This is why you need to really clean Emoji Apps and emoji keyboards from your phone files. Emoticons are cute but they defeat the whole purpose of having a Bluetooth-enabled hands-free communications system. Maybe it’s time to say bye, bye to smiley faces! So sorry!

Replacing a Stock Radio in a Ford Taurus 2002 SEL

So my friend and I are somewhat into car audio/visual (it’s a lot of fun) and decided to change out my stock Ford radio for an aftermarket one.

We didn’t really know what we were getting ourselves into until we got out the old deck. The ‘ol junker (well not really a junker, since it’s an EATC temperature control module coupled with a CD player) was one big circuit board. This thing looked so out-of-date that man could have went to the moon with it (produced in 1974).

We got the deck out, bought an aftermarket dash kit from the local car audio dealer, and connected the new deck. THAT part was easy – but wiring the EATC back up (electronic automatic temperature control) was worse then sticking yourself in the eye with a hot poker.

Here’s a tip to anyone who wants to replace their stock car radios – NEVER cut the wiring harnesses. That being said, finding another wiring harness for the beast that actually works has been almost impossible. None of the wiring diagrams off any website were of merit – and Ford has none themselves that could be of help to us.

On top of that, the aftermarket dash kit we bought didn’t have any knobs – they expected us to supply ones from the last heating system – and nothing to plug the knobs into. We could order the knobs – $12 each – order the switches – etc. The wiring harness was $80, the switches were around $100 for all three…so the total cost for fixing this heating system would be getting close to $500 when you incorporate the cost of the aftermarket dash kit as well.

I don’t think I’ll ever replace the stock radio in a Ford again. At least if I do, it would have to be a model that Ford RECOGNIZES and actually has help regarding the model. Buying replacement parts at Canadian Tire just doesn’t cut it – they never work or fit – and when a Ford dealership can barely help you, you really wonder who can.

Long story short – with winter fast approaching we fused two wires together to turn the heat on for the winter. Simple solution. Likely when summer rolls around, we’ll fuse a couple together to turn on the AC.

Only thing that bothers me is I can’t turn the heat up or down. But it’s on – so scrue it.